Master of Science in Information Technology

The Technology Program with a Soul ℠
Combining sound Computer Science concepts with real-world skills, our MSIT program will help you develop your mind and spirit for the challenges of Information Technology vocations.

The Program

The MS IT degree is a 39 credit program. Depending upon student background and preparation, CSC 501 may be waived resulting in a 36 credit program. While these are the minimum credit requirements, we encourage students to complete more than the minimum to enhance their graduate experience.

Should I Enroll?

Our program is designed to meet the needs not only of current IT professionals and new graduates interested in IT, but also those who enjoy using technology to help other people solve problems. It will provide you with the foundational knowledge and skills to understand computer systems and their relationship to business problems.

For more information, visit the Frequently Asked Questions page.

How Do I Start?

For program-specific information, online students should contact Prof. Michael Patch with any academic questions. On campus students should contact Prof. Jacob Hoppe with any academic questions. Dr. Gary Locklair can also be contacted with academic questions.

For additional information on admission requirements and financial aid, visit Concordia’s Graduate Department page.
For additonal contact information, vist the Contact page.

What will I learn?

Students in this program will develop the skills necessary to serve others within their Information Technology vocations through such classes as:
Vocation and Ethical Computing
Applied Artificial Intelligence
Human Computer Interaction
Database and Information Management
Web Systems and Technologies

Information Technology Degrees in the News

Job Outlook With an Information Technology Degree – Degreecentral.com
Posted September 20, 2013

Whether it is drafting reports at work, conducting research and writing papers in school, or logging on to your bank account online to pay bills, there is virtually no task today that does not, in one way or the other, utilize information technology. Technology has become a critical part of our public and personal lives. Individuals with an IT education and/or background not only have a great chance of finding immediate and meaningful employment, but also stand at the forefront of some of the most exciting and lucrative jobs in the future.

Read Full Article

Degrees That Get You Hired – Yahoo! Education

Posted September 20, 2013

Computers are an indispensable part of the economy, and so are graduates who study computer science, which ranks as the third most valuable degree in today’s job market.

Read Full Article

Technology Sector Remains Upbeat About Job Growth – NPR
Posted September 20, 2013

Google and Microsoft aren’t the only companies with technology jobs. Any company that manages lots of data, including hospitals, banks, insurance firms and retailers, needs technology workers.

Read Full Article

Fast Growing Careers That Pay – Yahoo! Education
Posted September 20, 2013

Computer software engineers rely on their knowledge of computer science and mathematical analysis to develop, design, test, and evaluate the software and systems that operate our computers. Their tasks are evolving quickly and reflect the ever-changing landscape of computer technology.

Read Full Article


FAQs

What is InformationTechnology?

Today, every business and enterprise requires Information Technology (IT) in order to function productively, efficiently and competitively in the global economy. Succinctly, IT is the engine powering current information systems (computers of all types, peripheral hardware, software, and communications).

As a discipline, Information Technology (IT) is an offspring of Computer Science. Whereas a computer scientist is able to create complex software and hardware systems, an information technologist is able to manage, configure and support computer systems used in enterprise computing and information processing.

Effective IT doesn’t just happen; it requires the effort of intelligent people. Clark once quipped, “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” However, effective IT doesn’t result from magic, but through the efforts of educated practitioners! Our MS IT program provides the foundational knowledge and practical skills to equip IT professionals to produce some “magic” for their organization.

 

What are the Differences between CS, IS, and IT?

While Computer Science, Information Systems, and Information Technology deal with common concepts, themes, and issues, there are distinguishing characteristics of each degree field.
1. CS – Computer Science focuses on creating computing applications in a variety of problem domains. A computer scientist investigates real-world problems and creates automated, computerized solutions for them. CS solves problems by creating software “tools” for people. Currently CUW offers an undergraduate major and minor in CS.

2. IS – Information Systems focuses on information aspects of computing within the context of business and personnel management. IS solves problems by integrating computing within business processes to provide information for decision making. IS programs are usually found within business schools in a university setting. Currently CUW offers a graduate degree in MIS within its MBA program.

3. IT – Information Technology focuses on the technology aspects of computing. Thus IT is the complement of IS. IT solves problems by responding to the practical, on-going needs of an organization for computing resources. All organizations are dependent upon computing for efficient and productive operation. Organizations need computing systems which work properly (installed, configured, secured) and are properly maintained (updated, patched, customized). IT solves problems by supporting employees in the use of computing resources. Currently CUW offers a graduate MS program in IT.

Is the MS IT for me?

Our program is designed to meet the needs of current IT professionals and new graduates interested in IT. The program is designed for those with either vocational experience or undergraduate education in IT-related fields. If you work in the IT industry, our program provides you the intellectual tools to perform better and keep current with rapidly changing IT. If you have a strong interest in IT, our program provides you with the foundational knowledge and skills to understand systems and their relationship to business problems.
The MS IT program is not just for “geeks.” If you enjoy technology and work with it for fun, you may do well in our program. On the other hand, success in our program requires good communication and problem-solving skills also. Therefore the MS IT appeals to a wide range of people with diverse backgrounds. Their common thread: a desire to understand, master and apply IT to help other people solve problems.

Unlike a Computer Science masters program, there is no “hard core” theory in the MS IT program. While there is a small amount of programming required, it is not over-emphasized. Our program does focus on foundational concepts and practical skills within a framework of “ethical computing.” Technology advances swiftly. The CUW MS IT program allows you to see the big picture and develop a road map for understanding current and new technology.

What are the vocations (jobs) in IT?

Almost every business needs qualified IT practitioners. While technology oriented firms certainly employ IT graduates, so too do service, heath care, finance, retail, marketing, manufacturing and a host of other companies. CUW graduates work for a broad spectrum of business.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer scientists and information technologists are expected to be among the fastest growing occupations through 2014. Employment of information and computer specialists is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations as companies continue to adopt and integrate increasingly sophisticated technologies.

Students list “career advancement” as one reason to pursue the MS IT degree. Perhaps an even more important reason is the satisfaction they receive when they are able to effectively solve a difficult problem for their employer.

Why choose CUW for the MS IT?

As the premier Lutheran university in North America, CUW emphasizes the vocation of information technologist within the curriculum. A vocation is not just a job producing a paycheck, but it is a heartfelt calling to serve others. The goal of IT is to serve other people by solving real problems. Every course in the curriculum discusses more than the technology as we integrate aspects of ethical computing into the material.
CUW has state-of-the-art computing resources to aid your education. In addition, all courses are taught by full-time CUW faculty or qualified adjunct professors. You will not find other students (teaching assistants) providing instruction in the MS IT program.

What are the admission requirements?

For immediate admission to the MS IT program you must either have an undergraduate degree in an IT-related discipline, or you must currently work in an IT-related field (regardless of your undergraduate degree). Without either of these requirements, you may still apply to the program. Your transcript and background will be evaluated and you may need to complete prerequisite courses as part of your admission to the program.
A masters degree is ideal for a rapidly changing technological environment. Because new technology and systems require new and increasing skill levels, continuing education is vital for IT practitioners. Businesses desire workers with both a broad background in technology and diverse interpersonal, communication and managerial skills. CUW offers a technology education within a broad-based liberal arts framework.

What is the MS IT curriculum?

The CUW MS IT degree program requires the student to complete 36 credits of course work (12 classes).
Required courses include:
Foundations of Information Technology
Vocation and Ethical Computing
Human Computer Interaction
Database and Information Management
Systems Development: Theory and Practice
Integrative Capstone
Elective courses include:
Introduction to Informatics
Applied Artificial Intelligence
Data Security and Information Assurance
Advanced Database Topics
Programming Practice II
Networking
System Design and Configuration
System Administration and Maintenance
Project Management
Web Systems and Technologies
Readings in IT
Internship in IT

What are the program formats and requirements?

The MS IT program is available in a distance format via eLearning and is also available in an accelerated on-campus classroom environment. Students from anywhere in the world can complete the MS IT program via web-based eLearning. The only residency requirement is to come to campus in order to present the final capstone project. Students close to the Mequon campus can complete the MS IT program via either eLearning or on-campus instruction (or a combination to suit their needs).
Selected courses are offered in an accelerated on-campus environment. These courses typically meet one evening a week for two months. Usually two courses are offered (back-to-back) each semester.

Distance students must (and all students should) have access to suitable computing resources. At a minimum this includes a fairly recent “wintel” architecture PC along with suitable internet connectivity. The student must have access to standard productivity software (eg, an Office suite). Students in the MS IT program will be provided with specific software in order to complete certain course requirements (eg, a programming language environment).

What are the program formats and requirements?

Prof. Richard Boenisch
Prof. Greg Dietsche
Prof. Jacob Hoppe
Dr. Mike Litman
Dr. Gary Locklair
Dr. Angus Menuge
Prof. Michael Patch
Dr. Charlie Shao
Prof. Bob Wahl

What are the program formats and requirements?

E-Learning appeals to students who seek specific learning not readily available in traditional programs, who may not be located near an institution, or who, for a variety of reasons, may wish to complete their degree by an alternative delivery system. This delivery system is not appropriate for everyone. Students who are self-motivated, independent learners will thrive in this environment.

What is E-Learning?

E-Learning appeals to students who seek specific learning not readily available in traditional programs, who may not be located near an institution, or who, for a variety of reasons, may wish to complete their degree by an alternative delivery system. This delivery system is not appropriate for everyone. Students who are self-motivated, independent learners will thrive in this environment. Read more about E-Learning.

How much is tuition?

Please view the tuition page on the CUW Graduate department for the current tuition cost per credit.

Who do I contact for more info?

Director, MSIT Program

Email Dr. Gary Locklair

Assistant Director, MSIT Program

Email Prof. Michael Patch

Assistant Director, MSIT Program

Email Prof. Jacob Hoppe

Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Sheryl Guse

International Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Cherise Beardsley

eLearning Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Meghan Beverung


PROGRAM ADMISSION

If you have gone through all of these pages and determined that the Master of Science in Information Technology degree at Concordia University is Wisconsin is a program that you are interested in, follow the steps below to begin the program.
1. Online students should contact Prof. Michael Patch with any academic questions. On campus students should contact Prof. Jacob Hoppe with any academic questions.

2. On campus students should contact Michelle Hoffman with any admission or financial questions. Online students should contact Meghan Beverung with any admission or financial questions. International students should contact Cherise Beardsley at international.admissions@cuw.edu or 262-243-4294.

3. Apply for admission by filling out the Online Application Form.

4. Submit the $50 application fee.

5. Submit a one page essay describing your motivation for choosing Concordia University Wisconsin as your graduate studies home and the MSIT program as your focus of study.

6. Send in your most recent resume.

7. Have two recommendations that are academic or professional in nature using the Recommendation Form. Recommendation letters on letterhead may be submitted also need to have completed and sent in.

8. Submit any official transcripts from all previous college experiences.

9. Await results of admission process.


Courses

CSC 501/801 – Introduction to Informatics
CSC 505/805 – Foundations of Information Technology
CSC 510/810 – Vocation and Ethical Computing
CSC 515/815 – Applied Artificial Intelligence
CSC 520/820 – Human Computer Interaction
CSC 525/825 – Data Security and Information Assurance
CSC 530/830 – Database and Information Management
CSC 532/832 – Advanced Database Topics
CSC 535/835 – Systems Development: Theory and Practice
CSC 537/837 – Programming Practice II
CSC 540/840 – Networking
CSC 545/845 – System Design and Configuration
CSC 550/850 – System Administration and Maintenance
CSC 555/855 – Project Management
CSC 560/860 – Web Systems and Technologies
CSC 565/865 – IT Integrative Capstone
CSC 570/870 – Readings in IT
CSC 580 – Internship in IT

CSC 501/801 – Introduction to Informatics

This course allows students to explore and understand the unique aspects of graduate studies in computer science and information technology at CUW. This course is especially helpful for students who have been away from higher education for some time or for international students. Practical issues related to graduate student success are investigated. The history and mission of CUW as a Lutheran higher education institution are examined. Emphasis is placed on reading and writing techniques for comprehension. Students will analyze their writing via the “writing cycle” as they read technical information and demonstrate comprehension of that information by creating effective documentation. Although CSC 501/801 does not satisfy degree requirements in CS or IT graduate programs, many students will greatly benefit from the foundation for success built in this course.
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012

Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
(The Coding text is provided by the department.)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 505/805 – Foundations of Information Technology
This course is a survey and overview of information technology used in the enterprise today. It includes such information technology fundamentals as: grand ideas of information technology; technology organizational issues; history of information technology; informing and allied disciplines; application domains; mathematical and statistical foundations; and ethical, moral and vocational issues in information technology. This course is the required first course in the Masters of Science in Information Technology curriculum. In addition to providing an overview of the discipline of information technology, the course develops an “IT mindset” in students by illustrating the diverse context and challenges in information technology.
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012

Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
(The Coding text is provided by the department.)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 510/810 – Vocation and Ethical Computing
This course provides the foundation for professional ethics in the field of Information Technology (IT). Students are familiarized with the doctrine of vocation and its implications for ethical attitudes, policies and behaviors within IT. They also learn the history of computer ethics and the codes of practice proposed by professional societies such as the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute for the Management of Information Systems. As our society becomes increasingly dependent on IT, it is imperative that students see their work as a means of service with social responsibilities that go far beyond the immediate legal and business-related requirements of their employer. Students learn that although the field of IT poses some unique ethical problems and challenges, these can be evaluated with the same moral criteria that apply in other walks of life. Specific topics studied include: serving the user’s needs; developing sustainable and modifiable solutions; creating ethical products; computer security and privacy (including the problems of malicious software, hacking and identity disclosure); intellectual property rights; and the ethical implications of an electronic global community. Relevant moral criteria are presented and applied to contemporary case studies.

Prerequisite: CSC 505/805
Required Texts: Computer Ethics and Professional Responsibility , Bynum and Rogerson (9781855548459)
Ethics: Discovering Right and Wrong, 7th edition, Pojman and Feiser, (9781111298173)
God at Work: Your Christian Vocation in All of Life, Veith (9781581344035)
3 Credit Hours.

CSC 515/815 – Applied Artificial Intelligence
This course discusses the concepts of intelligence, both human and machine, and the nature of information, its origin, description, and transmission. This course will offer a practical approach to incorporating artificial intelligence into useful applications. It includes such topics as: face recognition, speech recognition and robotic construction. The nature of human intelligence and the limits of machine intelligence will be treated from a scientific, philosophical, and computational perspective.
Prerequisite: CSC 505/805

Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Essence of Artificial Intelligence, Cawsey (0135717795)
The Mind of the Maker, Sayers (0060670770)
3 Credit Hours

CSC520/820 – Human Computer Interaction
Information Technology practitioners do not create and manage systems for their own personal interest; instead, they create and manage systems as effective problem-solving tools for others. This course deals with the fundamental IT issue of effective and usable human computer interaction. In addition to technical issues, people and process must be understood to create effective and usable tools. IT practitioners must develop a user-centered perspective within the organizational context. To that end this course will study related issues including cognitive principles, human-centered design, ergonomics, accessibility, emerging technologies and usable environments.
Prerequisite: CSC 505/805

Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Interaction Design, 3rd edition, Preece ISBN 978-0-470-66576-3, 2011
CIO Wisdom II: More Best Practices Laplante and Costello (0131855891)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 525/825 – Data Security and Information Assurance
This course is a survey and overview of methods to safeguard the information technology used in the enterprise today. IT systems are increasingly under attack and therefore knowledge of attacks, protection, and counter-measures is important to the IT practitioner. The IT practitioner must comprehend and manage assurance and security measures within the enterprise. Topics include: operational issues, policies and procedures, attacks and related defense measures, risk analysis, backup and recovery, and the security of information.
Prerequisite: CSC 505/805

Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Executive Guide to Information Security, Egan (0321304519)
Computer Security Basics, 2nd edition, Lehtinen, et al (0596006691)
Hacking: The Next Generation, ISBN 978-0-596-15457-8, 2009
3 Credit Hours

CSC 530/830 – Database and Information Management
This course provides students with the background to plan, design, implement, maintain, and use database management systems. It addresses the database structures, requirements, functions and evaluation of database management systems. The course focuses on the relational database model, standard SQL language, database structure normalization, conceptual data modeling, and the entity-relationship data model. Concepts of data integrity, security, privacy, and concurrence control are included.
Prerequisite: CSC 505/805

Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Modern Database Management, 10th edition, Hoffer, et. al. ISBN 978-0-13-608839-4
3 Credit Hours

CSC 532/832 – Advanced Database Topics
This course explores advanced topics in database and information management systems. It is designed to delve deeper into subjects presented in CSC 530 Database and Information Management. In addition, it will examine new topics that were not covered in the introductory course. The course will provide a combination of practical applications and theoretical information. Major topics include: distributed databases, object-oriented databases, security, advanced SQL, performance tuning, and database integration with the internet. Throughout the course, we will incorporate the requirement for ethical use of information.

Prerequisite: CSC 530/830
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Modern Database Management, 10th edition, Hoffer, et. al. ISBN 978-0-13-608839-4
3 Credit Hours

CSC 535/835 – Systems Development: Theory and Practice
This course is a survey and overview of creating software solutions using professional programming practice. Programming is a foundational skill for all computing disciplines. This knowledge area develops skills and concepts that are essential to good programming practice and problem solving. It covers fundamental programming concepts, event-driven programming, object-oriented programming, basic data structures, and algorithmic processes. The use of current development environments and languages will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: CSC 810
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Additional text TBD
3 Credit Hours

CSC 537/837 – Programming Practice II
Advanced computer programming concepts are explored within the genre of iPhone/iPad programming. An industry standard tool is used which allows students to create visually stunning iPhone/iPad applications while learning advanced programming techniques, and beginning data structures. Topics covered include: object oriented design, linked lists, stacks, queues, and recursion. These topics are covered within the context of good problem solving technique, algorithm design, and the iPhone OS software development kit (SDK).

Prerequisite: CSC 535/835
Required Texts: TBD
3 Credit Hours

CSC 540/840 – Networking
This course is an in-depth view of data communication and networking ranging from the primitive historical approaches to the ever changing modern state of the field. It includes principles of network design, using a top-down approach and focusing on technologies used in the Internet. It will help students learn to design network-aware applications using sockets, threading, and concurrency. It will help students understand how the Internet works, from the transport layer down to the physical layer. It will help students prepare for future positions in research and development by introducing them to the latest research in Internet technologies. It will help students become better writers by emphasizing written work where possible. It will also help students apply networking technology in ways that can enrich their lives and assist in spreading the Gospel.

Prerequisite: CSC 505/805
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Additional text TBD
3 Credit Hours

CSC 545/845 – System Design and Configuration
This course provides an in-depth treatment of those concepts practitioners must understand to effectively design and configure information technology systems. Topics include: operating systems, computer organization and architecture, computing infrastructures, enterprise deployment software, firmware and hardware, scripting and task automation, backup, and configuration.

Prerequisite: CSC 530/830
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
System Analysis and Design, 8th edition, Kendall & Kendall (978-0136089162)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 550/850 – System Administration and Maintenance
This course presents concepts and skills the professional system administrator must understand to effectively maintain enterprise information technology. Topics include: operating systems, application packages, administrative activities, administrative domains.

Prerequisite: CSC 545/845
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
The Practice of System and Network Administration, Limoncelli, Hogan and Chalup (0321492668)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 555/855 – Project Management
Project management concepts, skills, and techniques are vital for the successful development of any product using the software engineering process. This course will cover issues such as: requirements, request for proposals, acquisition and sourcing, integration, testing and quality assurance, and organization context.

Prerequisite: CSC 530/830
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Coding: The Handbook of Information Technology, Axelson (0976627906)
Brewer, Jeffrey L., Dittman, Kevin C., Methods of IT Project Management, Prentice Hall (Pearson), ISBN: 978-0-13-236725-7, 2010
3 Credit Hours

CSC 560/860 – Web Systems and Technologies
From eCommerce to data mining, web systems are the primary information repository of 21st century information technology. This course focuses on: web technologies, information architecture, digital media, web design and development, vulnerabilities and social software.

Prerequisite: CSC 520/820
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Web Application Architecture: Principles, Protocols and Practices, 2nd Edition (ISBN: 978-0-470-51860-1)
SOA In Practice: The Art of Distributed System Design (ISBN: 978-0-596-52955-0)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 565/865 – IT Integrative Capstone
The integrative capstone course provides the student the opportunity to showcase computer science concepts and problem solving skills by effectively analyzing a real problem and synthesizing an effective solution. Students choose an acceptable problem and then fully implement the solution to that problem following professional programming practice in a software engineering framework. Students present their progress and project via written reports and oral presentations. The final acceptable project includes an actual product along with both process and product documentation equivalent to a masters thesis.

Prerequisite: candidate status
3 Credit Hours

CSC 570/870 – Readings in IT
This course provides insights into effective reading and writing techniques in the domain of information technology. In addition to specific activities focusing on reading and writing about information technology, students will select an interesting area of IT to investigate as a guided independent study. Useful information sources for technology will be explored, and students will be challenged to read widely and well as a foundation for life-long learning.

Prerequisite: CSC 505
Required Texts:Computer Science: An Overview, 11th Edition ISBN 978-0-13-256903-3, 2012
Writing for Computer Science, 2nd Edition, Zobel (9781852338022)
How to Read a Book, Revised edition, Adler & Van Doren,(0671212095)
3 Credit Hours

CSC 580/880 – Internship in IT
1 Credit Hour


Courses Schedule

Consult the current schedule of classes via the portal for registration information. If you have questions, contact your advisor or the MS IT program director, Dr. Locklair. See the course descriptions for detailed information about each course.

The MS IT program has three semesters per year: Fall (Sep – Dec); Spring (Jan – May), and Summer (Jun – Aug).

On-campus MS IT courses are run in an accelerated 8 week format, usually meeting one night a week for 4 hours.

In a typical Fall and Spring semester, we run two “sessions” of 8 weeks “back-to-back” (session “A” and session “B”). This allows students to take at least two on-campus courses a semester, if they wish. Usually courses are offered on different nights, so students can take more than one course each session, if they wish.

Typically the Fall and Spring semester begin during the same week as the undergraduate semester and run for an additional week. The summer semester often begins the week after the end of Spring semester MS IT courses.

eLearning classes do not run on a traditional semester schedule. You may register for an eLearning class at any time, and the deadline for completion is 12 weeks after registration.
Classes listed below are the standard rotation of MSIT classes.

Summer

501 – Introduction to Informatics

Session: Day: Tuesday Room: S120
Times: 5 – 9 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

505 – Foundations of Information Technology

Session: Day:Thursday Room:S118B
Times:6 – 10 PM Type:Required Instructor:Locklair
Course Description

532 – Advanced Database Topics

Session: Day:Wednesday Room:S118B
Times:6 – 10 PM Type:Elective Instructor:Wahl
Course Description

565 – IT Integrative Capstone

Session: Day: Monday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

570 – Readings in IT

Session: Day: Tuesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Hoppe
Course Description

580 – Internship in IT

Session: Day: TBA Room: TBA
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Shao
Course Description

FALL

501 – Introduction to Informatics

Session: Day: Tuesday Room: S120
Times: 5 – 9 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

505 – Foundations of Information Technology

Session: Day: Thursday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

515 – Applied Artificial Intelligence

Session:B Day: Monday width=”33%”Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Hoppe
Course Description

520 – Human Computer Interaction

Session:A Day: Thursday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Boenisch
Course Description

530 – Database and Information Management

Session:B Day: Tuesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Wahl
Course Description

537 – Programming Practice II

Session:B Day: Wednesday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Litmann
Course Description

555 – Project Management

Session:A Day: Tuesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Wahl
Course Description

560 – Web Systems and Technologies

Session:B Day: Tuesday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Shao
Course Description

565 – IT Integrative Capstone

Session: Day: Monday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

580 – Internship in IT

Session: Day: TBA Room: TBA
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Shao
Course Description

SPRING

501 – Introduction to Informatics

Session: Day: Tuesday Room: S120
Times: 5 – 9 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

505 – Foundations of Information Technology

Session: Day: Thursday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

525 – Data Security and Information Assurance

Session:B Day: Monday Room: S118B
Times: 5 – 9 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Hoppe
Course Description

535 – Systems Development: Theory and Practice

Session:A Day: Wednesday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Litmann
Course Description

540 – Networking

Session:B Day: Wednesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Electtive Instructor: Shao
Course Description

545 – System Design and Configuration

Session:A Day: Tuesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Wahl
Course Description

550 – System Administration and Maintenance

Session:B Day: Tuesday Room: S118B
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Electtive Instructor: Wahl
Course Description

565 – IT Integrative Capstone

Session: Day: Monday Room: S120
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Required Instructor: Locklair
Course Description

580 – Internship in IT

Session: Day: TBA Room: TBA
Times: 6 – 10 PM Type: Elective Instructor: Shao
Course Description

eLearning

Every course in the MS IT program is offered via eLearning. You may register for and begin an eLearning course at any time.
Required courses
CSC 805 – Foundations of Information Technology
CSC 810 – Vocation and Ethical Computing
CSC 820 – Human Computer Interaction
CSC 830 – Database and Information Management
CSC 835 – Systems Development: Theory and Practice
CSC 865 – Integrative Capstone
Elective courses
CSC 815 – Applied Artificial Intelligence
CSC 825 – Data Security and Information Assurance
CSC 840 – Networking
CSC 845 – System Design and Configuration
CSC 850 – System Administration and Maintenance
CSC 855 – Project Management
CSC 860 – Web Systems and Technologies
CSC 870 – Readings in IT
CSC 880 – Internship in IT


Faculty


CONTACT

Concordia University Wisconsin

12800 N. Lake Shore Drive
Mequon, Wisconsin 53097-2402
Phone: 262.243.5700
Fax: 262.243.4351
Toll Free: 1.888.628.9472

Director, MSIT Program

Email Dr. Gary Locklair

Assistant Director, MSIT Program

Email Prof. Michael Patch

Assistant Director, MSIT Program

Email Prof. Jacob Hoppe

Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Sheryl Guse

International Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Cherise Beardsley

eLearning Graduate Admission Counselor

Email Meghan Beverung


NEWS

Information Technology Degrees in the News

Prepare For A Career That Pays Over $85K

Posted September 21, 2013
Career #6 – Computer and Information Systems Manager Computers baffle some people – but not you. Which means it could be time for you to build on your computer-savvy and prepare for a high-paying career as a computer and information systems manager. As a computer and information systems manager, you might analyze your company’s computer needs, recommend and install upgrades to computer hardware and software, and negotiate with technology vendors to get the best service for your company, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
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Five Smart Alternatives To Traditional College Degrees

Posted September 21, 2013
And the sky is the limit for computer science degree holders. “I think you can go anywhere with a computer science degree. It’s the very first degree that comes to mind as being good to have on a resume,” says Heathfield. That’s because every business is dependent on computers, computer networks, and the Internet, and people who are experts in this field will go far, she says.
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Job Outlook With an Information Technology Degree – Degreecentral.com

Posted September 20, 2013
Whether it is drafting reports at work, conducting research and writing papers in school, or logging on to your bank account online to pay bills, there is virtually no task today that does not, in one way or the other, utilize information technology. Technology has become a critical part of our public and personal lives. Individuals with an IT education and/or background not only have a great chance of finding immediate and meaningful employment, but also stand at the forefront of some of the most exciting and lucrative jobs in the future.
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Degrees That Get You Hired – Yahoo! Education

Posted September 20, 2013
Computers are an indispensable part of the economy, and so are graduates who study computer science, which ranks as the third most valuable degree in today’s job market.
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Technology Sector Remains Upbeat About Job Growth – NPR

Posted September 20, 2013
Google and Microsoft aren’t the only companies with technology jobs. Any company that manages lots of data, including hospitals, banks, insurance firms and retailers, needs technology workers.
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Fast Growing Careers That Pay – Yahoo! Education

Posted September 20, 2013
Computer software engineers rely on their knowledge of computer science and mathematical analysis to develop, design, test, and evaluate the software and systems that operate our computers. Their tasks are evolving quickly and reflect the ever-changing landscape of computer technology.
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IT jobs “to grow much faster than the average, and job prospects should be excellent” – US Department of Labor

Posted September 20, 2013
Overall employment of computer network, systems, and database administrators is projected to increase by 30 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. In addition, this occupation will add 286,600 new jobs over that period.
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MSIT Program PolicieS

Graduation Requirements

The MS IT degree program requires the successful completion of at least 39* credit hours of Computer Science graduate courses. The following 7 courses are required: 501/801*, 505/805, 510/810, 520/820, 530/830, 535/835, 565/865 for 21 credits. In addition, the student selects a minimum of 18 credits from among the following electives: 515/815, 525/825, 532/832, 537/837, 540/840, 545/845, 550/850, 555/855, 560/860, 570/870, 580/880.
* Students admitted with an undergraduate degree in Computer Science or Information Technology from a regionally accredited US university may have the 501/801 (Introduction to Informatics) course requirement waived. For these students the MS IT degree program is a minimum of 36 credit hours

The successful completion of a course requires a grade of “B-” or better. Earning a grade of less than “B-” indicates insufficient mastery of the material for the MS IT program. Students earning a grade of C+ or below in a course are required to retake that course. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 of higher is required for graduation.

Many MSIT courses have one or more course prerequisites. The student must successfully complete the course prerequisite(s) with a grade of “B-” or higher before beginning the course.

Transfer Credits

A maximum of six credits may be transferred in to CUW’s MS IT program from graduate-level coursework completed at a regionally accredited US university. The program director will consider course content, learning activities, and grade earned when making a determination of the equivalency of the transfer course. Credit transfer requests must be initiated and approved during the admission process before the student begins the MS IT program.

 

Attendance

Attendance at all on-campus class sessions is expected and necessary to be successful in the course. Because emergencies do arise, students may be excused from a maximum of one on-campus class session during a course. To be considered present for a class session, the student must be present the entire time.

 

Successful Progress / Good standing

A student who has earned a B or better in each class is making successful progress in the program and is in Good standing. A student who earns a B- in any course will still be considered to be in Good standing as long as their cumulative GPA is 3.0 or above. A student who earns less than a B- in a course is in Course Deficient standing. The course needs to be repeated and a satisfactory grade earned within the next semester in order to return to Good standing. Students with a cumulative GPA below 3.0 are in Probationary standing. The cumulative GPA must be raised to at least 3.0 within the next 9 credits attempted or the student will be subject to dismissal.

 

Late Work

Assignments must be submitted online by the due date. Late assignments are not accepted.

 

Initial Courses

CSC 501/801 and 505/805 must be completed as the first two courses in the program. These courses may be taken concurrently.

 

Course Registration

Students must register for an on-campus course before the date of the first class meeting. A class may not be added once the course has begun.

 

Academic Misconduct

Cheating takes many forms and is unacceptable academic conduct. Plagiarism is taking the words or ideas of another and presenting them as your own. In CUW’s MS IT program, cheating and plagiarism are unacceptable. Both are cause for dismissal from the program.
See the general graduate school policies for additional information on academic misconduct, including cheating and plagiarism.

 

Grading Scale

The MS IT course grading scale is as follows:
A 93% and above: outstanding mastery and creative thought
A- 90-92%: excellent mastery and creative thought
B+ 88-89%: excellent mastery and insight
B 83-87%: good understanding, knowledge, and skills
B- 80-82%: acceptable understanding with good knowledge
– – – –
C+ 78-79%: acceptable understanding
C 73-77%: general competence
C- 70-72%
Grades below “B-” demonstrate a need for improvement. A student who earns less than a B- in a course is in Course Deficient standing. The course needs to be repeated and a satisfactory grade earned within the next semester in order to return to Good standing.

 

On-campus course participation

Students are expected to be active participants in on-campus courses. This includes arriving for the beginning of class on time, returning from breaks on time, staying for the entire class session, and remaining engaged with the course content, fellow students, and the instructor.

 

Academic Dishonesty

Cheating takes many forms and is unacceptable academic conduct. Plagiarism is taking the words or ideas of another and presenting them as your own. In CUW’s MS IT program, cheating and plagiarism are unacceptable. Both are cause for dismissal from the program.

See the general graduate school policies for additional information on academic misconduct, including cheating and plagiarism.

All instances of academic dishonesty are reported by the faculty member to the program director and institution administration. The following outcomes are recommended:

1) First instance: The faculty member determines the penalty. This may include any of the following: an opportunity to redo the assignment or test, a reduced grade on the assignment or test, a failing grade on the assignment or test, a lower grade in the course, a failing grade in the course, or removal of the student from the course.

2) Second instance: The faculty member determines the penalty, and the campus-specific Chief Academic Officer (CAO) or designee connects with the student at which time additional sanctions may be imposed.

3) Third instance: The faculty member determines the penalty, and the Academic Conduct Board (ACB) meets with the student at which time additional sanctions may be imposed, including suspension or expulsion. On the Mequon campus the ACB consists of the CAO at Mequon, AVP of Academics for Student Success, and the Dean of the School in which the student resides. On the Ann Arbor campus the ACB consists of the CAO at Ann Arbor, the Dean of Students, the campus Dean of the School in which the student resides, and the appropriate Program Director. The decision of the ACB is final.

 

Appeals

Under certain circumstances, students may appeal decisions made by the faculty member. The student may use the appeals procedure to present extenuating circumstances which may lead to readmission as a graduate student. He or she will also need to present a plan for successful continuation in the program.
On the Mequon campus students may appeal a faculty-issued academic dishonesty decision or penalty in writing to the Dean of the School in which the course was offered within 15 working days of receiving the report. The Dean (in consultation with the Department Chair or Program Director or Center Director) will consider the appeal and render a decision within 10 working days of receiving the appeal and issue a written response to the student.

On the Ann Arbor campus, this appeal should be directed to the appropriate campus Dean.